Princess Eugenie reveals the late Queen’s corgis are ‘barky’ but ‘really sweet’ around her sons August and Ernest – and says she won’t send the boys to boarding school until they’re 13 because she wants to ‘hang out’ with them for as long as she can

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Queen Elizabeth II strokes Candy, her corgi, as she looks at a display of memorabilia from her Golden and Platinum Jubilees in February 2022

Princess Eugenie has revealed the Queen’s corgis are ‘barky and big’ but ‘really sweet’ as she discussed plans for her children and reflected on the dos and donts of dinner with granny.

Speaking to the Table Manners podcast, hosted by singer Jessie Ware and her chef mother Lennie, Eugenie gave some insight into what Queen Elizabeth II’s beloved dogs are really like. 

Asked if the corgis are nice to children, Eugenie said: ‘Yeah. They’re barky and they’re big, but they’re really sweet. They have like big fat fluffy paws.’

On the podcast Eugenie spoke about her plans to send her sons August, two, and Ernest, five months, to boarding school – revealing she wants them to wait until they’re a bit older than their father Jack Brooksbank was when he boarded at just eight-years-old.

She also recalled what it was like to have dinner with her granny, the Queen, including how the table was a strictly no-knees zone – and her elders often told her off if her knees were up at the table. 

Queen Elizabeth II strokes Candy, her corgi, as she looks at a display of memorabilia from her Golden and Platinum Jubilees in February 2022

On the podcast Eugenie spoke about whether or not she plans on sending her children Augie and Ernie (both pictured) to boarding school, like both her and her husband Jack

On the podcast Eugenie spoke about whether or not she plans on sending her children Augie and Ernie (both pictured) to boarding school, like both her and her husband Jack

Princess Eugenie of York and Queen Elizabeth II attend Day 1 of Royal Ascot at Ascot Racecourse on June 18, 2013

Princess Eugenie of York and Queen Elizabeth II attend Day 1 of Royal Ascot at Ascot Racecourse on June 18, 2013

During the chat, Eugenie discussed her late grandmother’s Corgis, Muick and Sandy, who were adopted by her parents Prince Andrew and Sarah Ferguson after Her late Majesty’s death. 

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‘Why did your family love them so much?’ Jessie asked. ‘Where did it come from? Has it always been a tradition?’

‘No, my great-granny had them and then my granny loved them because of that,’ Eugenie replied. 

‘And then that was it. She made it what it is today.’

Later in the podcast, Eugenie was asked if she went to boarding school as a child and if she enjoyed it. ‘I loved it,’ she said. ‘I absolutely loved it.’

Jessie then asked ‘Do you think you’d send your kids to boarding school?’

‘Yeah, at 13,’ Eugenie replied. ‘I think my husband went to boarding school at eight. Yeah, I mean, looking at my sons now. I want to hang out with them. I like playing with them. I don’t want them to leave.’

Eugenie went on to say that she wouldn’t send her children to boarding school as young as her husband had gone, but added that when a little older it was ‘amazing to board’.

‘At that point, yeah, it was amazing to board and then to be with all your friends and have that grown-up sensibility and all that kind of stuff,’ she said. ‘But yeah, I wouldn’t send them an eight.’

‘I haven’t told Jack that,’ she confessed.

The Wares' Table Manners podcast is about food, family and 'the art of having a chat' so an integral part of the Queen's family were of course brought up during Eugenie's appearance - her corgis (pictured at the Queen's funeral), who were adopted by the princess's parents

The Wares’ Table Manners podcast is about food, family and ‘the art of having a chat’ so an integral part of the Queen’s family were of course brought up during Eugenie’s appearance – her corgis (pictured at the Queen’s funeral), who were adopted by the princess’s parents

Here the Queen arrives in Aberdeen, Scotland with her corgis to start her holidays in Balmoral in 1974

Here the Queen arrives in Aberdeen, Scotland with her corgis to start her holidays in Balmoral in 1974

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Later in the podcast, Eugenie (pictured with her son Augie) was asked if she went to boarding school as a child and if she enjoyed it. 'I loved it,' she said. 'I absolutely loved it.'

Later in the podcast, Eugenie (pictured with her son Augie) was asked if she went to boarding school as a child and if she enjoyed it. ‘I loved it,’ she said. ‘I absolutely loved it.’ 

Eugenie, the youngest daughter of Prince Andrew and Sarah Ferguson, gave birth to her first son in February 2021. Pictured with August at the late Queen Elizabeth's Platinum Jubilee

Eugenie, the youngest daughter of Prince Andrew and Sarah Ferguson, gave birth to her first son in February 2021. Pictured with August at the late Queen Elizabeth’s Platinum Jubilee

The Ware podcast also touched on its titular theme, table manners; and dinner etiquette growing up in the Royal Family. 

Asked if there were certain things she had to do growing up, Eugenie said she had two different sets of table manners – one for when she was dining with the Queen and another at home. 

‘We had table manners A,’ she said. ‘Like really little people – table manners A was when we were with Granny and table manners Z was when we were at home.’

Eugenie also revealed that as youngsters they couldn’t have ‘knees at the table’.

She said: ‘So like my mum, if I had a knee at the table, she’d say “Are they invited to lunch? Are they invited to dinner?” And so they’d be down. 

‘But it was like a funny thing. So now if any of our friends are around and they put their knees up my mum’s like, you know.’

The princess reflected on her summers in Scotland – which she described as her ‘favourite place on the planet’ – which consisted of picnics of trips to bothies and picnics. 

Queen Elizabeth II waves to the crowds as she stands on the balcony of Buckingham Palace with Prince Philip, Princess Margaret and Princess Eugenie after the Trooping the Colour ceremony in June 1998

Queen Elizabeth II waves to the crowds as she stands on the balcony of Buckingham Palace with Prince Philip, Princess Margaret and Princess Eugenie after the Trooping the Colour ceremony in June 1998

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Jack and a pregnant Eugenie pictured in April, at the traditional Easter Sunday Mattins Service at St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle

Jack and a pregnant Eugenie pictured in April, at the traditional Easter Sunday Mattins Service at St George’s Chapel, Windsor Castle

Princess Eugenie welcomed her second baby with husband Jack Brooksbank, named Ernest George Ronnie, in May

Princess Eugenie welcomed her second baby with husband Jack Brooksbank, named Ernest George Ronnie, in May

She said: ‘We’d hang out at the little bothies, the little houses. And it would be very much like, we’d all be getting Tupperware out of the basket, picnic hampers, and like opening them, and then helping ourselves to like the salad and cold meats and bits like that. So that was very much normal.’

‘It’s my favourite place on the planet,’ she added. ‘Well, where we go in Scotland, the Cairngorms are the most beautiful – It’s one of the most beautiful national parks.’ 

As the podcast drew to a close, Lennie asked: ‘Can I ask something that might be a bit rude?’

‘But as the royal family, as more young, do you think you are modernising? Do you think there are changes in attitudes and it’s becoming more modern?’

Eugenie replied: ‘It’s less about modernising and more about becoming one with what the monitor believes in,’ she said, describing her uncle and cousin, King Charles and Prince William, as ‘amazing examples of that’.

‘And the way they’ve been brought up and the work they believe in,’ she concluded. 

‘It’s not like they’re thinking, “God, we’re going to modernise it”. It’s just to say they’re moving with their belief systems and what the world believes.’

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