Our partners cheated on us using THESE bizarre apps: Women reveal how they caught their boyfriends using platforms like LinkedIn and Depop to betray them – as relationship expert warns the trend is on the rise

titeduvn

One woman claimed she checked her partner's LinkedIn to find him messaging 27 other woman

Apps such as Snapchat, Instagram and Facebook are common places to look if you suspect your partner is cheating on you. 

However, more and more ‘infidelity-lurkers’ are turning to unlikely platforms to conduct their illicit affairs – such as LinkedIn, Depop and Vinted. 

Traditionally used to connect professionals, LinkedIn may seem like the last place a partner would cheat – while Depop and Vinted are merely designed to flog unwanted clothes. 

But as one UK relationship expert warned, there has been a ‘noticeable shift’ in the number of cheaters using these apps, as their suspecting partners are unlikely to look beyond more obvious messaging platforms such as WhatsApp. 

Did a partner use an unlikely app to cheat on YOU? Email katherine.lawton@mailonline.co.uk 

Victims of cheating via random apps have shared their infidelity horror stories on social media, with one claiming she checked her partner’s LinkedIn to find him messaging 27 other woman. 

‘When my ex says he never cheated on me, but I caught him talking to 27 other women on LinkedIn,’ she wrote. 

Another revealed she has trust issues after discovering her boyfriend used Depop to cheat on her. ‘That one guy who cheated on me on DEPOP and taught me never to trust a man again,’ she penned. ‘He fell in love with her skirt.’

One woman claimed she checked her partner’s LinkedIn to find him messaging 27 other woman

One user messaged  a seller on Depop in an attempt to snare her partner who was 'using depop like tinder'

One user messaged  a seller on Depop in an attempt to snare her partner who was ‘using depop like tinder’

Another woman revealed she has trust issues after discovering her boyfriend used Depop to cheat on her

Another woman revealed she has trust issues after discovering her boyfriend used Depop to cheat on her

See also  July 1st What happened on this day in history

People have taken to X to discuss the issue of people cheating via careers app LinkedIn

People have taken to X to discuss the issue of people cheating via careers app LinkedIn 

It comes after MailOnline reported that a swarm of savvy singletons have been turning to LinkedIn to find love – discarding conventional dating apps such as Tinder, Bumble and Hinge. 

A third person, whose partner also used LinkedIn to assist his affair, shared her experience on TikTok, writing: ‘When I had a feeling my ex was cheating on me so I checked his LinkedIn and found a girl, found her Insta, and dmed her just to find out that he did in fact cheat on me.’ 

Jessica Leoni, sex and relationships expert at Illicitencounters.com, said there has been an increase in the number of people turning to unusual platforms to seek flings, as the chances of getting caught are much slimmer. 

Using LinkedIn as an example, Ms Leoni told MailOnline: ‘The feeling that you’re not breaking rules because you’re reaching out on a professional platform in a work context removes an element of guilt and, because it’s LinkedIn, your chances of getting caught are slimmer.

‘There’s certainly been a noticeable shift in people turning to different platforms to seek dates, or even flings. There’s been multiple instances where LinkedIn users have called out unsolicited approaches from other members on the platform, and we’ve seen the trend reported in the media in the past couple of months.’ 

She added: ‘There’s also a bit of drain from traditional date apps – the likes of Depop, Vinted and Temu feel like a fresh hunting ground for date seekers and cheaters.’ 

But Ms Leoni said that while sales apps such as Depop might be safe for cheating, LinkedIn is much riskier as it could cause devastating impacts to your career. 

See also  After Train Tracks And Road In Bihar, Thieves Steal 50-Metre Tall Mobile Tower In UP Village

‘Seeking out people to have an affair with via LinkedIn is an incredibly risky idea,’ she said.  

Another woman said her ex used careers app LinkedIn to assist in his illicit affair

Another woman said her ex used careers app LinkedIn to assist in his illicit affair 

One woman found out her boyfriend had cheated when she saw a photo of a woman selling a top with his bedroom in the background The person the boyfriend cheated with said she didn't know he was in a relationship

One woman found out her boyfriend had cheated when she saw a photo of a woman selling a top with his bedroom in the background 

‘Anyone you approach on LinkedIn will then know your history, your current job and even your boss’s name. So, if they deem your behaviour inappropriate, there could be some serious repercussions in your work life. 

‘They could report you or even publicly shame you in a post. It’d be smarter to meet an illicit encounter on a different site initially before moving to LinkedIn communication.’ 

She added: ‘Depop, Vinted and Temu are arguably safer platforms for cheating as they’re less centred around professionalism and career prospects.’

Ms Leoni’s comments come after a debate erupted this week on the Flirt Forum, with users questioning whether affair-seeking on LinkedIn is a problem.

One online user commented: ‘For an affair it seems ridiculous to use LinkedIn. For two single people it is still unusual to use a professional platform in this way, but then some chat about work may lead to flirting. 

‘It seems crazy to use this platform to start an affair though and more likely to result in a screenshot of the ”advance” being sent out to the world via X or Reddit.’ 

Another person wrote: ‘I block immediately, it’s literally an ick, to be sat doing my job and a random guy pop up asking me if I want to go out for a drink! Urgh…… Professionally , my head doesn’t work like that in the workplace!’ 

See also  Ex pats turning Dordogne villages into 'little Britain' ruffle French feathers by opening 'English' shops and moan workers return 'half drunk' from long lunches - while locals say Brits are 'slow' to learn language

It comes after videos on social media showed swarms of people claiming to have tried dating on LinkedIn – with some even finding love.

One video showed a well-dressed couple posing to music alongside the caption: ‘Connecting with him on LinkedIn and bagging him in his final year of med school.’ 

Another showed 37-year-old Candice, who lives in Singapore, explaining that she turned her attention to LinkedIn so she could filter matches by education level, profession and country.

A spokesperson for LinkedIn said: ‘LinkedIn is a professional community and we encourage our members to engage in meaningful, authentic conversations that do not violate our community policies. 

‘Romantic advances and harassment of any form is a violation of our rules, and our policies include detailed examples that show what kind of content does not belong on LinkedIn. Members can report any instances of harassment on LinkedIn and signal to us that such behaviour is unwanted, allowing us to take action.’

MailOnline has contacted Depop and Vinted for comment. 

Categories: Trending
Source: tit.edu.vn

Leave a Comment