Is your Stanley cup safe? Brand responds to viral claims that its popular Quencher tumbler contains lead

titeduvn

Stanley has dispelled concern that its beverage containers are toxic following claims they contain lead. The brand stated that lead is not present on the surface of any of its products

Stanley fans are questioning if their insulated cups are safe to drink from following claims that they contain lead, and while they technically do, that doesn’t mean they are dangerous.

The brand’s viral Quencher tumblers have become a must-have hydration accessory, with loyal customers collecting various colors and limited-edition collaborations, but accusations of lead exposure have sparked growing concerns on social media. 

Since 2023, TikTok users have been sharing videos of themselves performing at-home lead tests on the beverage containers, with some of them allegedly indicating the presence of lead, a naturally occurring toxic metal. 

Fears surrounding the safety of the cups have led Stanley to dispel the allegations that its products are harmful and explain its manufacturing process. 

Stanley has dispelled concern that its beverage containers are toxic following claims they contain lead. The brand stated that lead is not present on the surface of any of its products 

The company explained that its products are sealed with 'an industry-standard pellet that includes some lead,' but it is 'completely enclosed' and 'inaccessible to consumers'

The company explained that its products are sealed with ‘an industry-standard pellet that includes some lead,’ but it is ‘completely enclosed’ and ‘inaccessible to consumers’

‘Please rest assured that no lead is present on the surface of any Stanley product that comes in contact with you or the contents of your container,’ Stanley International said in a statement to NBC affiliate WCNC.   

DO STANLEY CUPS CONTAIN LEAD? 

Stanley International released a statement assuring customers that ‘no lead is present on the surface of any Stanley product that comes in contact with your or the contents of your container.’

The company explained that its vacuum insulated stainless steel products are sealed with ‘an industry-standard pellet that includes some lead.’ 

However, the ‘pellet is completely enclosed by a stainless-steel cover, making it inaccessible to consumers.’

See also  Startling Road Rage Incident In Karnataka: Dashcam Captures Attack On Family Amid Threats

Stanley stressed that all of its products meet ‘all U.S. regulatory requirements, including California Proposition 65, which requires businesses to provide warnings to Californians about heavy metal and chemical exposure.’  

‘Every Stanley product meets all U.S. regulatory requirements, including California Proposition 65, which requires businesses to provide warnings to Californians about heavy metal and chemical exposure.’ 

The company explained that its vacuum insulated stainless steel products are sealed with ‘an industry-standard pellet that includes some lead.’ 

However, the ‘pellet is completely enclosed by a stainless-steel cover, making it inaccessible to consumers.’

The inside of a Stanley cup does not come in contact with the pellet, which means it is highly unlikely that drinking liquid from the container would cause lead exposure.

Experts told Today.com that there is only a risk of lead exposure if the stainless-steel barrier comes off and someone touches the pellet and then their mouth or nose. 

Although the circular cover can come off with use, it is a ‘rare’ occurrence, according to a spokesperson for the brand. 

If the barrier becomes unsealed at any time, customers can submit a claim through the company’s lifetime warranty. 

Tamara Rubin, a lead poisoning prevention advocate known as ‘Lead Safe Mama,’ tested a Stanley cup for lead and other heavy metals using XRF technology in March 2023. 

The $35,000 spectrometer instrument she used is the same one used by the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), according to Today.com. 

Tamara Rubin, a lead poisoning prevention advocate known as 'Lead Safe Mama,' tested a Stanley cup without its bottom cover and found traces of lead in March 2023

Tamara Rubin, a lead poisoning prevention advocate known as ‘Lead Safe Mama,’ tested a Stanley cup without its bottom cover and found traces of lead in March 2023

She also used a LeadCheck swap test on the area, which turned pink, indicating traces of the toxic metal 'These should not be used if the bottom seal is compromised,' she said

Rubin also used a LeadCheck swap test on the area, which turned pink, indicating traces of the toxic metal. ‘These should not be used if the bottom seal is compromised,’ she said

See also  Married couple behind 'disgustingly cringeworthy' dating trend hit out at 'shocking' backlash they've faced since going viral: 'People want terrible things to happen to us'

Rubin did not state that she found traces of lead inside the cup, although some have claimed they had, including a post that is making the rounds on Facebook (pictured)

Rubin did not state that she found traces of lead inside the cup, although some have claimed they had, including a post that is making the rounds on Facebook (pictured)

Rubin tested the bottom of a Stanley cup that was missing a cover and confirmed there was lead. She also used a LeadCheck swap test on the area, which turned pink, indicating traces of the toxic metal. 

‘These should not be used if the bottom seal is compromised,’ she concluded. 

Rubin did not state that she found traces of lead inside the cup, although some have claimed they had, including a post that is making the rounds on Facebook. 

Others filmed themselves doing similar at-home tests that came out negative. The accuracy of the tests is unknown, as they vary between brands.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) established performance recognition criteria for lead test kits in its 2008 Lead Renovation, Repair, and Painting (RRP) Rule.

Three lead test kits are recognized by the EPA: 3M LeadCheck, D-Lead, and the State of Massachusetts lead test kits.

Fitness model Nicole Brady and mom Margo Smith were among the TikTok users who put their Stanley tumblers to the test. They were both pleased to report that there were no traces of lead in their cups. 

Lead is a naturally occurring metal found in small amounts of the earth’s crust that can be toxic to humans and animals, according to the EPA. 

Fitness model Nicole Brady tested the inside of her Stanley cup for lead twice in her TikTok video. She deduced the tumbler was 'fine' after both tests were negative

Fitness model Nicole Brady tested the inside of her Stanley cup for lead twice in her TikTok video. She deduced the tumbler was ‘fine’ after both tests were negative 

See also  I'm a millionaire Romany Gypsy - I own a Rolls Royce and live in a £1.5 million house but I'll never give up my traditional ways

Mom Margo Smith also put her Stanley cup to the test on TikTok She held up her at-home test swab to show her container didn't have any lead in it

Mom Margo Smith also put her Stanley cup to the test on TikTok. She held up her at-home test swab to show her container didn’t have any lead in it 

Lead poisoning is often caused by exposure to contaminated paint and dust in water, air, and soil. Young children are particularly vulnerable to overexposure because poisoning can damage their mental and physical development. 

‘Even low levels of lead that were once considered safe have been linked to harmful changes in intelligence, behavior, and health,’ Paul Allwood, the lead poisoning prevention and surveillance branch chief at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Environmental Health, told Today.com.

Rubin explained on her website that she has been rallying against the use of lead in household products since her infant sons were lead poisoned and suffered permanent disabilities while their home was being painted in 2005.

She was mostly concerned about the barrier on the Stanley cups falling off and children coming into contact with the area. 

‘Though some people say [the] protective disc doesn’t come off easily, I’ve heard from many people who say that for them it has,’ she told the outlet. 

It’s important to note that the pellet in Stanley’s products is the ‘industry standard,’ meaning it’s used by other brands as well. 

The viral cups have been proven to be safe as long as the bottom seal stays in place. 

DailyMail.com has reached out to PMI Worldwide, the owner of Stanley products, for comment.  

Categories: Trending
Source: tit.edu.vn

Leave a Comment