I wasn’t offered a seat on the London Tube while I was breastfeeding – it made my blood boil

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Samantha Holmes, 29, has revealed her fury at being made to stand up on the tube while breastfeeding her baby because no one would offer her a seat (Pictured: Samantha on a London Underground train with her two-month old daughter Celine)

A woman has shared her outrage after being made to stand up on the tube while breastfeeding her baby because no one would offer her a seat. 

Samantha Holmes, 29, and her husband Jarred, 35, got on the train at London Euston hoping they would find a seat so Samantha could feed their two-month old daughter Celine.

The mother-of-two and registered nurse claimed none of the other passengers even ‘acknowledged’ her despite her daughter acting ‘hysterical’. And so she was forced to feed her baby while standing up.

The couple stood the whole route and eventually alighted the Metropolitan line train at Wembley Park.

Samantha has since slammed the commuters for their insensitivity to her plight. She recounted: ‘It was about 7pm at night on the way back on the tube.

Samantha Holmes, 29, has revealed her fury at being made to stand up on the tube while breastfeeding her baby because no one would offer her a seat (Pictured: Samantha on a London Underground train with her two-month old daughter Celine)

‘Our daughter had had some bad trapped wind and nothing I was doing was consoling her.

‘So we were standing initially and I’d expected someone to give me a seat with her being so hysterical. But no acknowledgement, and I just said to my husband I’d have to feed her’.

Samantha emphasised the struggles feeding mothers faced while journeying on public transport, saying they were made to feel ‘invisible’.

She also recalled being so furious, her ‘blood was boiling’ – and she even asked her husband to record the incident. 

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She continued: ‘It’s hard enough to keep your balance on your own, never mind whilst trying to feed a two-month-old child. That’s when I said to my husband, take a photo of this as I couldn’t believe it. I felt invisible – could anyone even see me?

‘Everyone had their heads down. I’m comfortable breastfeeding so that doesn’t affect me.

‘But for some people that are nervous to feed in public – that could have caused them to stop breastfeeding. I just couldn’t believe it. My blood was boiling’.

According to the Transport for London website, all buses, Tubes, trains and trams have clearly marked priority seats for anyone who needs them.

The mother-of-two and registered nurse claimed none of the other passengers even 'acknowledged' her despite her daughter acting 'hysterical'. And so she was forced to feed her baby while standing up (Pictured: Samantha with her husband Jarred, 35, and their daughter Celine)

The mother-of-two and registered nurse claimed none of the other passengers even ‘acknowledged’ her despite her daughter acting ‘hysterical’. And so she was forced to feed her baby while standing up (Pictured: Samantha with her husband Jarred, 35, and their daughter Celine)

It adds: ‘If one isn’t available, ask if someone will give up a seat. You can apply for a Please Offer Me a Seat badge and card or a Baby on Board badge to help you get a seat if you need one’.

The news comes after research found that just six in 10 commuters would give up their seat for an expectant mother.

The study of 2,000 regular users of public transport also found one in four commuters hadn’t given up their seat for a woman who they suspected was pregnant, in case she wasn’t actually expecting.

The study also found adults believe you don’t need to offer mother-to-be a seat until she is visibly showing.

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Researchers found the battle for a seat amid the morning or afternoon rush hour can lead to passengers neglecting their manners or failing to notice pregnant women.

The research was commissioned by Mama Mio skincare as part of their I’m Expecting campaign which encourages expectant mums to not be afraid to ask someone to give up their seat.

Anna Whitehouse, who is an ambassador for the campaign, said: ‘Pregnancy is not a weakness, but it is a vulnerability and I felt this during my first trimester in particular.

‘Busy, hot, and cramped commuting conditions can be incredibly stressful both physically and mentally, and being able to sit down can make a difference.

‘However, from my own experience, I find that people are either too engrossed in their phones to be aware of their surroundings, or won’t offer their seat unless prompted.’

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Source: tit.edu.vn

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