I have the most recognisable voice in the UK but no-one knows it’s me – it’s like living a double life

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Emily Cass, 25, from south London , has recorded hundreds of adverts, radio inserts and TV shows and been the voice of brands including Lidl , Co-op and Samsung

A voiceover artist who has featured in hundreds of TV and radio ads says she leads a double life – as the ‘most iconic voice’ but ‘least recognisable face in the UK. ‘

Emily Cass, 25, from south London,  has recorded hundreds of adverts, radio inserts and TV shows and been the voice of brands including Lidl, Co-op and Samsung.

She is also a continuity announcer for Nick Jr and Channel 5’s Milkshake – saying things like ‘coming up next, Peppa Pig’ and ‘time for Ben and Holly’s Little Kingdom’ in between programmes.’

She rarely tells people what she does for a living – as she often receives requests to ‘give us a voice’ and hears others say they could ‘easily do that’. ‘

But Emily says feeling like she’s living a double life can be fun – and she wants to work as a voiceover artist for the rest of her life.

Emily Cass, 25, from south London , has recorded hundreds of adverts, radio inserts and TV shows and been the voice of brands including Lidl , Co-op and Samsung

Emily is also a continuity announcer for Nick Jr and Channel 5 's Milkshake - saying things like 'coming up next, Peppa Pig' and 'time for Ben and Holly's Little Kingdom' in between programmes

Emily is also a continuity announcer for Nick Jr and Channel 5 ‘s Milkshake – saying things like ‘coming up next, Peppa Pig’ and ‘time for Ben and Holly’s Little Kingdom’ in between programmes

She says her rates vary – but she follows a standard rate card for voice actors – which includes £250 for a standard TV gig involving adverts or continuity.

‘Someone once asked me how it feels to have the most iconic voice in the UK – I think that’s nice, but hate when people bring it up,’ she said.

‘It’s kind of funny, I could be shopping or driving and I’ll hear my own voice on the radio, thinking ‘that’s me!’

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‘It’s such a different kind of job – my voice really is everywhere.’

Despite never formally training as a voice actor, Emily realised it was what she wanted to do after meeting a voice extra from the animation Flushed Away while at a drama summer camp, in July 2012.

She said: ‘I’ve always been a chatterbox, I grew up doing theatre and arts, and I went to a drama summer camp in July 2012, when I was 14.’

Emily rarely tells people what she does for a living - as she often receives requests to 'give us a voice' and hears others say they could 'easily do that

Emily rarely tells people what she does for a living – as she often receives requests to ‘give us a voice’ and hears others say they could ‘easily do that

Emily says her rates vary - but she follows a standard rate card for voice actors - which includes £250 for a standard TV gig involving adverts or continuity

Emily says her rates vary – but she follows a standard rate card for voice actors – which includes £250 for a standard TV gig involving adverts or continuity

‘One of the teachers had been a voice artist for Flushed Away – I thought that was so cool, it became a defining moment of my career.’

‘I became really enthusiastic about the idea of becoming a voice artist, and from a young age I knew it was what I wanted to do. ‘

‘I remember my science teacher telling me I’d fail my GCSE, and I was like”OK, I don’t want to do this anyway.”

At the age of 20, Emily spent £1,000  on recording equipment – including a top-quality microphone, headphones and recording interface.

She hired a one-time producer for £250, and they helped her put together a voice reel to send to employers.

Despite never formally training as a voice actor, Emily realised it was what she wanted to do after meeting a voice extra from the animation Flushed Away while at a drama summer camp, in July 2012

Despite never formally training as a voice actor, Emily realised it was what she wanted to do after meeting a voice extra from the animation Flushed Away while at a drama summer camp, in July 2012

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At the age of 20, Emily spent £1,000 on recording equipment - including a top-quality microphone, headphones and recording interface

At the age of 20, Emily spent £1,000 on recording equipment – including a top-quality microphone, headphones and recording interface

Having just begun her career, Emily didn’t have anything to include in the reel – but she decided to read out scripts aimed at ‘kids and teens’ – as she thought her voice sounded immature. ‘

The reel included inserts for CBeebies, kids’ toys and student open days – as well as an NHS awareness-raising campaign for chlamydia.

She said: ‘I came in at 20, and I sounded very young – you’ve got lots of voiceover artists aimed at kids, but hardly any for teens or graduates.’

‘I found myself targeting the teens – I branded myself as someone young and bubbly, with a sweet voice.’

‘I read a lot of adverts out on my reel, some for CBeebies, some for kids’ toys – even one for chlamydia.’

Having just begun her career, Emily didn't have anything to include in the reel - but she decided to read out scripts aimed at 'kids and teens' - as she thought her voice sounded immature

Having just begun her career, Emily didn’t have anything to include in the reel – but she decided to read out scripts aimed at ‘kids and teens’ – as she thought her voice sounded immature

Since then she's been the voice of Samsung, Spotify and Mercedes - as well as hundreds of other brands and campaigns. But, despite her passion for voice acting, she won't talk about it in public - after one too many people asked her to 'do a voice

Since then she’s been the voice of Samsung, Spotify and Mercedes – as well as hundreds of other brands and campaigns. But, despite her passion for voice acting, she won’t talk about it in public – after one too many people asked her to ‘do a voice

In November 2018, at the age of 20, Emily got her first role – voicing inserts for Nick. Jr.

Since then she’s been the voice of Samsung, Spotify and Mercedes – as well as hundreds of other brands and campaigns.

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But, despite her passion for voice acting, she won’t talk about it in public – after one too many people asked her to ‘do a voice’. ‘

She says it’s like living a double life – and she’s happy to have ‘the most iconic voice in the UK’ – without being recognised on the street. ‘

‘Whenever people would tell me I had a nice voice, I used to be like – oh, this is what I do for a job,’ she said. ‘

‘Then they’d ask me to”give them a voice”, or tell me they reckon they could be a voice artist themselves. ‘

‘I think it’s one of those careers that actually – I don’t think just anyone can do it. ‘

‘You can’t just speak into the microphone and get paid, you need an understanding of how things are supposed to sound, and you need to be hyper-aware of how you sound. ‘

‘It’s also quite lonely work – you’re mostly just sat in a recording booth by yourself. There’s not much of a social element to it.’

Despite this, Emily is keen to work in voice acting for the rest of her life – switching up her niches as she gets older.

She said: ‘I’m quite versatile, I think. ‘

‘As you get older, things will change and your casting will change – I’ll probably end up doing M&S adverts rather than Superdrug or Nickelodeon, but I fully intend to keep doing this for the rest of my life.’

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