Decoding The Astonishing Science Behind Our Love For Thrillers

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Decoding The Astonishing Science Behind Our Love For Thrillers

If you were confronted with a scene of unimaginable gore, with several of your fellow humans being hacked to death and their entrails and vital fluids strewn about the room, your first instinct would presumably be to flee and seek safety (assuming you weren’t too busy vomiting). 

It would be strange, even frightening if you offered to pay to witness this scenario, possibly while eating popcorn or nachos (which can also cause vomiting if consumed in excess).

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What sort of content is most widespread in the thriller genre? 

Nonetheless, a large number of people technically do this. The Saw franchise alone has made nearly a billion dollars at the box office, and that’s just one series of horror flicks. 

There are a plethora of other alternatives and formats available, many of which are geared toward presenting people with scenes of severe gore and/or dread.

And people gobble it up (not literally, that would be terrible). The point is that there is certainly a large market for things that should rationally frighten or repulse us.

Why do people love thrillers? 

The excitation-transfer theory is the most fundamental. Being afraid and eliciting the fight-or-flight reaction is extremely stimulating, with a variety of distinct effects on our brain’s functioning. 

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According to excitation-transfer theory, the excitement experienced through fear is fundamentally transmitted to other experiences that may or may not be equivalent in any way. Scary things, in essence, make everything else more “vivid,” which is exciting and alluring.

How does the science behind this work?

Another viewpoint is that we all have these dark impulses or “forbidden thinking,” and having a way to express them is beneficial. People frequently wonder about stealing, attacking, cheating, and other heinous crimes. 

You know what this is like if you’ve ever stood next to someone near a high drop and wondered, “What would happen if I just pushed them off?” Some suggest that watching horror movies and other “video nasties” gives us an outlet for this thinking/compulsion, making us less inclined to act on it in general. 

What do you think about this? Tell us in the comments.

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Source: tit.edu.vn

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